Author Topic: Common Maintenance Thread  (Read 1620 times)

Travis Gregory

  • Administrator
  • U20 Enthusiast
  • *****
  • Posts: 130
  • U20 - 222
Common Maintenance Thread
« on: February 11, 2017, 12:12:04 AM »
This thread will house common fix posts.  It will be a sticky at the top of the maintenance section.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2017, 12:14:02 AM by Travis Gregory »

Travis Gregory

  • Administrator
  • U20 Enthusiast
  • *****
  • Posts: 130
  • U20 - 222
Running Rigging
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2017, 12:23:46 AM »
Running Rigging Specifications
« Last Edit: February 11, 2017, 12:32:40 AM by Travis Gregory »

Travis Gregory

  • Administrator
  • U20 Enthusiast
  • *****
  • Posts: 130
  • U20 - 222
Keel Repair
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2017, 12:37:35 AM »
Keel Repair - Richard Hunt

Bayview had this problem with all six boats You can grind out the keel box two ways 1. drop the keel out of the box using a crane 2. take the keel plate off put the boat in the water and lower the keel out of the way (not to far) Dremel works great to grind out the cracks , clean out all the debris I used Epoxy with 406 adhesive filler to fill the cracks, a syringe is helpful to inject into the cracks then put 2" tape over the cracks to keep the epoxy in place and the sanding to a minimum. Then spray a little gelcoat over that for looks I also put 10 thought bolts in the keel box (5 a side) ,the pictures I sent show 4 total around the wedge area of the box ,these are old photos. 5 bolts a side help keep the keelbox from moving or flexing , epoxy does not like to flex . In photo 001 you can see the bolts going thought to the G-10 which is a good backing plate to hold the keel box together I did countersink the bolts Drill the holes for the keel bolts first before you epoxy the cracks The epoxy putty USI uses is ok it works . but even a boat that sees very little use will eventually leak into the air tight compartment I will take some more pictures if any body would like to see the 10 bolt system Richard Hunt.

Travis Gregory

  • Administrator
  • U20 Enthusiast
  • *****
  • Posts: 130
  • U20 - 222
Repair for the Wood Stringer Under the Mast Compression Post
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2017, 12:39:32 AM »
Written by Steven Stollman #54

Travis Gregory

  • Administrator
  • U20 Enthusiast
  • *****
  • Posts: 130
  • U20 - 222
Make Your Own Turnbuckle Adjusters
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2017, 12:44:08 AM »
Turn Buckle Construction

Here is a quick step by step guide to making the handles Its not hard on step 2 of the handles diagram change the word wrench to vice in the middle section. I am going to put together a photo guide step by step that will look a lot better. Then you can see how I position the 1/8" rod in the vice to make the bends. After you make the turnbuckle handle you must drill out the Ronstan turnbuckle Step 1. Find the pilot hole already there , put the turnbuckle in the vice hole facing up Step 2. Use a 1/8 inch carbide drill made for cutting metal and start drilling out the pilot hole Step 3. when you brake thought to the center go slow into the threaded side of the turnbuckle . The threads will want to make the drill bit drill off center so go nice and slow until you get threw the threads Step 4. Take the turnbuckle out of the vice tap it upside down to get all of the metal shavings out Step 5. I use a 1/4 32 tap to clean up the threads of the Ronstan turnbuckle after drilling to make sure there are no snags with the shroud That's it put the handle and the turnbuckle together I use white electrical tape on the handles so they don't pull apart. You can use a small piece of Velcro maybe 4' inch's long 1/2 wide or less double sided at the base of the Ronstan turnbuckle Tie one end to the base of the ronstan turnbuckle and rap the Velcro around the handle to secure them in place when not in use. Last Step 1. A handle to go on the shroud I use a 1'' delron plastic rod 2 1/2 '' inch's long and drill a 1/4 ''inch hole thought the center of the rod 2. I use a scribe to scratch out the inside of the 1/4 ''inch hole so it does not slip when around the shroud. just something for the epoxy to grab hold of. 3. After that I put the plastic rod on the belt sander to shape it into a flat oval kind of shape 4 I take a file and put a few vertical scratches on the shroud tang where the handle will be 5. Tape the threads so epoxy does not drip down on to the threads (you can epoxy the handles on when the mast is up) or you need something to hold the shrouds up wile epoxy sets a vice works 6 Put a little slow epoxy on the tang of the shroud 7 Slip the handle into place. turning as you go up. to spread the epoxy around 8. Put tape on the bottom of the turnbuckle handle to hold it in place. 9. Drip more epoxy in the top of the hole if needed 10. If it is too warm out and the epoxy is running out of the bottom of the turnbuckle you can use a filler in the epoxy I have used the west system 406 adhesive filler to give it a little body and to help it stick to the handle and shroud That's it. They work great . No tools needed to raise or lower the mast and tuning is a hole lot easer. Richard Hunt mad man at work.

Travis Gregory

  • Administrator
  • U20 Enthusiast
  • *****
  • Posts: 130
  • U20 - 222
Dyform Guide
« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2017, 04:36:55 PM »
Complements of Brady Lofthouse (Forty-Two)